Denmark Hill and Camberwell

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-pjnwy-d7bc17
This podcast is about a walk I do around the ‘Belgravia of South London’ Camberwell and Denmark Hill. Camberwell was renowned for its market gardens and Denmark Hill used to be the site of royal hunting grounds, and is thought to take its name from George Prince of Denmark, the consort of Queen Anne.

A New World

Despite having no paid work or income at the moment I am still keeping myself busy working on projects which I hope will bear fruit in a future where we are allowed out and about once more. Obviously there’s the podcasting where I have dipped my toe, but I am also revising notes, starting to research via the internet walks and tours I shall be able to offer when we are out of lockdown.
[
caption id=”attachment_2436″ align=”aligncenter” width=”736″] The Thames and Tower Bridge under Grey Skies[/caption]

Who knows how tourism will look in twelve months time? This may be the start of a completely different way of doing things. That is exciting as well as daunting. Continue reading “A New World”

Podcast: C the City!

While we are in lockdown here in London, I thought I’d try my hand at some podacasting. My cat was keen to join in, so it took several attempts to get something I could post! definitely more practice and skill with the cutting tool needed!

So I hope you enjoy it, tomorrow I mean to do another one about Denmark Hill and Camberwell where I was due to lead a walk in the morning. Continue reading “Podcast: C the City!”

Not to be missed

Another beautiful, sunny day in London, but cold. Cold by our standards anyway, though visitors from Canada, parts of the US, even Ireland, tell me it’s warmer here than at home.

It makes sense to divide your time between the outdoors and a warmer environment. There are two exhibitions, both ending soon, I recommend. Both Bridget Riley and Mary Quant were born in south London.

Bridget Riley, she of the famous canvases of dots, stripes and geometric shapes, has an exhibition that ends this week at the Hayward Gallery on the Southbank.

The captions are my own.
Continue reading “Not to be missed”

Flying the flag

I hear the current incumbent of the White House doesn’t like the new United States Embassy building in London. I can’t understand why. To my eye it is far more pleasing than the one in Grosvenor Square, plus it’s in Vauxhall, or at least Vauxhall/Battersea borders, and Vauxhall is one of my favourite London neighbourhoods.
Consider these exhibits:

The Embassy

The Embassy of the United States of America

The Embassy, detail

What, as they say, is not to like? Continue reading “Flying the flag”

The Tower of London at Christmas

This is the lovely group of people who came on my tour of the Tower of London this morning.

The Group by the White Tower

It was a perfect morning to visit the Tower: blue skies, a few morning skaters enjoying the ice rink that is in the moat until early January, no queue at the jewel house.

South Side White Tower

The ravens were active and noisy. A couple of Yeoman Warders advised members of a school group to eat the packed lunches they had brought in a different spot, or risk the ravens stealing sandwiches and crisps.

Raven on the Mount

W

King Henry III’s White Bear

The Queen’s House
Continue reading “The Tower of London at Christmas”

Where Light Falls: Coventry

Two cities; two cathedrals.

London and St Paul’s; Coventry and St Michael’s.

In both cities the cathedrals were and are strong emblems of unity and identity. London’s current cathedral replaces one lost in the Great Fire of 1666; Coventry’s one lost in November 1940 during the Blitz.

Where Light Falls

A few weeks ago I attended a special event at St Paul’s. A light show played across the west front of the cathedral; images from the war interspersed with text from a poem written especially for the occasion which was simultaneously broadcast, read by Keith Jarret who wrote it together with people from London.

This weekend I was in Coventry for the sister event. More light, more images of a ruined cathedral, rubble piled high, a different poem projected onto the walls, simultaneously broadcast, read by Jane Commane who wrote it together with people from Coventry.

Until a few years ago. I had never been to Coventry. Now it is a city I look forward to taking people to visit. In 2021 it is to be the City of Culture. Preparations are very much underway.

Where Light Falls

I defy anyone to stand in the ruins of the old cathedral and not be moved. Watching the light show, listening to the poem, witnessing the rapt attention of the crowd, gearing the pride in their voices for their city, amplified my admiration and affection for Coventry. There is huge civic pride. The people love their city. They have good reason too.

Where Light Falls
Continue reading “Where Light Falls: Coventry”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑